March 03, 2011

Movie Review: The King's Speech (2010)

I don't know what I was picturing from the film The King's Speech (2010). I knew it was about British royalty and someone with a stammer. For whatever reason, I pictured a stodgy film about people dressed up in period costume walking around in gloomy British rainy weather. I think it was because of reading a review, which mentioned the main character was King George VI. Whenever I picture kingly-type people, I picture people dressed in tights and a furry cape, looking surly and uncomfortable.

 Blessedly, The King's Speech was about a king who lived in 1939 and didn't wear tights or a cape. King George VI (Colin Firth) seems so normal. He's a blustery, humble man with a temper, which is especially triggered by a long line of speech therapists who are hired to "cure him" of his stammer. Good ol' 'enry 'iggins tried to make Eliza Doolittle speak better by making her talk with marbles in her mouth, and apparently this was a popular technique used by speech therapists round the world. Maybe the reason this king seems so likable is that he never wanted to be king. Before he was King, he was Prince Albert, Duke of York. He only became King because his brother gave up his title to marry an "unsuitable."